Boeing Launches New Nacelle and Flight-Control Surface Exchange programme

Parts distributed through the program represent all Boeing models updated to the latest configurations
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Boeing has announced the launch of a new Nacelle and Flight-Control Surface Exchange Program. Under the program, customers can exchange nacelle and flight-control surface parts that need repair or overhaul from a certified pool that Boeing maintains throughout its global network. This eliminates the need for customers to contract, schedule, manage and own or lease these parts.

“Our customers have asked for more flexibility and we’ve heard them,” said Lynne Hopper, vice president of Parts Solutions. “This offering is one more example of how Boeing creates high-quality, flexible solutions that make life more convenient for our customers, allowing them to mix and match procurement approaches ranging from ownership to pooling to leasing to exchanging.”

Parts distributed through the program represent all Boeing models and are updated to the latest configurations, incorporating all applicable service bulletins and airworthiness directives.

Another benefit of an exchange is that customers only need to take an airplane out of service once, reducing maintenance needs. When a similar part is leased, the plane must be taken out of service for both removal and installation. 

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