FAA: Boeing 737 MAX software upgrade is ‘operationally suitable’

A recommendation presented as part of the draft report is that pilots should receive additional computer-based training for the MCAS automated flight platform
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A malfunction with the MCAS platform is believed to be the root cause behind the recent 737 MAX crashes that led to the aircraft family being grounded across the world.
A malfunction with the MCAS platform is believed to be the root cause behind the recent 737 MAX crashes that led to the aircraft family being grounded across the world.

The United States’ Federal Aviation Administration unveiled a draft report from the Boeing 737 MAX Flight Standardization Board that found the updated software for the aircraft’s anti-stall software to be ‘operationally suitable’.

Additionally, the draft report proposed a training revision for pilots suggesting that they should receive additional computer-based training for the updated Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS).

A malfunction with the MCAS platform is believed to be the root cause behind the recent 737 MAX crashes that led to the aircraft family being grounded across the world.

Last month, Ethiopian Flight ET 302 crashed six minutes after take-off from Addis Ababa in Ethiopia. All 157 on board were killed in the incident.

The crash marked the second deadly incident involving a 737 MAX aircraft in less than six months.

After grounding the entirety of its global fleet of 737 MAX aeroplanes, Boeing has been hard at work to develop software changes to its MCAS platform.

Currently available for public review, FAA’s draft report will be updated will a final board reported expected for release two weeks from the present.

Earlier in the week, US President Donald Trump publicly recommended that Boeing “rebrand” its 737 MAX aircraft after addressing its technical challenges. The comments were made as part of a series of tweets on his official Twitter account.

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