Blockchain firm bags $5m to automate airport security

System could eventually eliminate the need for passengers to carry physical documentation and undergo repeated ID checks in airports
Share
Blockchain, Airport security, Aviation security, Passenger checks, International Airlines Group, IAG, Zamna

Automated airport security is a step closer after a tech firm specialising in blockchain application secured $5m of seed funding from multiple investors.

Zamna, which is already backed by British Airways parent group IAG, claims that an airport security system that uses blockchain could eventually reduce the need for manual or other checks by up to 90%.

The tech firm secured funding from LocalGlobe and Oxford Capital, Seedcamp, the London Co-Investment Fund (LCIF), Telefonica and a number of other investors.

It is hoped that overtime, a system that shared passenger identities securely between agencies could create a seamless security journey for air travelers who could avoid having to carry physical documentation in airports.

You might like

UAE's GCAA hosts blockchain workshop

Remus Brett, partner at LocalGlobe, told TechCrunch: “With passenger numbers expected to double in the next 20 years, new technology-driven solutions are the only way airlines, airports and governments will be able to cope. We’re delighted to be working with the Zamna team and believe they can play a key role in addressing these challenges.”

Speaking to TechCrunch, Irra Ariella Khi, co-founder and CEO of Zamna, said: “There is a preconception that when you arrive at the airport somehow — as if by magic — the airline knows who you are, the security agencies know who you are and the governments of departure and destination both know that you are flying between their countries and have established that it is both legitimate and secure for you to do so.

"You may even assume that the respective security authorities have exchanged some intelligence about you as a passenger, to establish that both you and your fellow passengers are safe to board the same plane. However, the reality is far from this."

Most Popular

Newsletter