British Airways study reveals UAE traveller habits

Commissioned by BA and conducted by Drench Design, the study's findings were compiled from responses of 1,000 UAE residents
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In terms of food and drink consumption, 42% admitted to diving straight into food once served, while another 66% reportedly will consume food and drink in the air that they would avoid while on the ground.
In terms of food and drink consumption, 42% admitted to diving straight into food once served, while another 66% reportedly will consume food and drink in the air that they would avoid while on the ground.

In an effort to better tailor offerings to customers flying out of the UAE, British Airways commissioned a study that explored the travel habits of passengers. Examining everything from individual routines to specific food and drink products consumed, the study paints a clear picture of passengers’ needs throughout the travel experience.

According to the study’s results, roughly 56% of UAE adults admit to sticking to the same habits and rituals on their journey. Seventy-six percent of adults revealed being organised in their travels, while 21% report minor deviations into their travel plan.

In terms of food and drink consumption, 42% admitted to diving straight into food once served, while another 66% reportedly will consume food and drink in the air that they would avoid while on the ground.

Fifty percent of passengers from the UAE are likely to consume sweets while flying, while 53% consume more nuts than while on the ground.

The study was commissioned by the national carrier following its recent multi-million-pound investment to improve its World Traveller catering service. Conducted by Drench Design, the research included responses taken from 1,000 residents living in the UAE.

Carolina Martinoli, director of brand and customer experience at British Airways, commented: “Travelling by its very nature requires people to relinquish an element of personal control, so we know it helps people to have routines in place to manage that, be that one person being in charge of the passports, getting to the airport early or being ready at the gate as soon as the flight is called.”

She added: “These habits are an important part of the holiday ritual and they don’t stop at the airport — in-flight habits such as keeping a phone and money in a pocket or choosing what to eat onboard are all part of it too, which is why our investment in our long-haul catering is proving so popular. It caters to all those needs, from the travellers who want to try new food to those who like to squirrel snacks away for later.”

For more detailed info on the study, keep an eye out for the full infographic in AVB's upcoming March edition.

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