Lion Air Flight JT 610 crashes off the coast of Jakarta

The incident marks the first instance a Boeing 737 MAX 8 aircraft has been involved in a major incident
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Lion Air Flight JT 160 was due to arrive at Depati Amir airport an hour after taking off from Jakarta.
Lion Air Flight JT 160 was due to arrive at Depati Amir airport an hour after taking off from Jakarta.

Lion Air Flight JT 160 has crashed into the sea, shortly following take-off from Soekarno–Hatta International Airport. The flight was due to arrive at Depati Amir airport an hour after taking off from Jakarta at 06:20 local time on the 29 October, but contact with the aircraft was lost 13 minutes into the flight.

A total of 189 people were reported to have been travelling on the flight that was headed to Pangkal Pinang, the largest city on the Indonesian island of Bangka.

While debris and some remains of bodies have been discovered at sea, search efforts for the main wreckage are still ongoing.

The flight was being serviced by a Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft. The incident marks the first instance an aircraft of this type has been involved in a major incident.

Additionally, Lion Air has shared that the aircraft involved completed its manufacturing in 2018 and was released to the airline back on the 15 August.

Indonesian Officials have confirmed that of the 189 reported onboard, 181 were passengers, along with five cabin crew members and two pilots.

Check back soon for more updates.

Update: 03/11/18

Divers have reportedly found the main fuselage of Lion Air Flight 610 and have also discovered signals from the aircraft's second black box. While the primary black box was recovered last Thursday, Indonesian officials have to yet to extract any data yet from the device.

Indonesia's Search and Rescue Agency have also reported the death of a diver, Syahrul Anto, 48. An experienced diver, Anto was discovered unconscious by his diving partner and was immediately brought back to shore. The paramedics on site were unfortunately unable to resuscitate the diver.

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