Trump claims planes 'too complex' amid Boeing 737 Max woes

In his official Twitter feed, the President of the United States shared 'Pilots are no longer needed, but rather computer scientists from MIT'
Share
The comments are the first to be shared by the US President on the current crisis currently affecting the US-based Boeing.
The comments are the first to be shared by the US President on the current crisis currently affecting the US-based Boeing.

Amidst the ongoing developments surrounding the recent Ethiopian Airways Flight ET 302 incident, in which a Boeing 737 Max 8 crashed roughly six minutes into the flight, US President Donald Trump shared on his official Twitter account that aircraft were becoming too complicated to operate.

“Airplanes are becoming far too complex to fly. Pilots are no longer needed, but rather computer scientists from MIT. I see it all the time in many products,” tweeted Trump.

“Always seeking to go one unnecessary step further, when often old and simpler is far better. Split second decisions are needed, and the complexity creates danger. All of this for great cost yet very little gain” added Trump.

“I don’t know about you, but I don’t want Albert Einstein to be my pilot. I want great flying professionals that are allowed to easily and quickly take control of a plane!”

The comments are the first to be shared by the US President on the current crisis currently affecting the US-based Boeing.

In February 2019, Trump, along with with Vietnamese President Nguyen Phu Trong, was witness to a signing ceremony between Boeing and Vietjet, which saw the purchase of 100 additional 737 Max aircraft by the Vietnamese carrier. The deal included 20 Max 8 aircraft, along with 80 larger Max 10 variants.

Back on 11 Sunday 2019, Ethiopian Airways Flight ET 302 crashed after taking off Addis Ababa in Ethiopia. All 149 passengers and eight crew members were killed in the crash.

The crash is the latest incident involving the Boeing 737 Max 8, which saw a similar deadly disaster with Lion Air Flight JT 160 back in October 2018. In that instance, the aircraft crashed in the Java Sea just 13 minutes into the flight. As a result, all 189 passengers and crew perished.

Since then a number of countries have moved to ban the use of the aircraft within their respective airspaces.

While commercial operations involving the 737 Max 8 in the US remain unaffected at the moment, the country’s US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has ordered Boeing to introduce critical software updates to address the issue.

Most Popular

Newsletter